Brioche dough vs Croissant dough

A popular viennoiserie like Pain aux Raisins can be made with either brioche dough (sweet bread) or croissant dough (flaky puff pastry). Take your pick.

Brioche dough is made of :

Flour T45, Yeast, Salt, Granulated sugar, Eggs, softened butter and some water.

Chef starts adding in a Kitchen Aid (using hook attachment) flour, yeast, salt, sugar and add eggs gradually. Adding a little bit of water to pick up the dry ingredients. It takes around 15-20 mins or until the dough is not sticking to the side of the bowl. Then, add the softened butter little by little gently kneading but not excessively. Your dough is done once butter is mixed in and you should here the dough making a slapping sound against the bowl. It’s ready!

Place the dough in a prover. If you don’t have a prover you just need to create a warm environment for the dough to rise. You can for example put plastic over the dough with air surrounding it.

When the dough has risen, punch it down (“rompre” or “rabattre” in French) and put in the fridge for at least 12 hours.

Punch it down again a second time, shape and rise at 30°C.

Baking 220°C for around 5 minute and then turn down to 180°C to finish

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Note: In a recipe similar to this one you may see instructions to make a “yeast starter”  or in French a “poolish” this is mixing the yeast with a little water and a little flour from the recipe.

 Croissant dough or in french it’s called either, Pâte à croissants or Pâte levée feuilletée, this is made of:

Flour (farine) sifted type T45 and type T55, Salt (sel), Sugar (sucre), Yeast (levure), Milk (lait)

Pâte à lever feuillettée translates to dough rising pastry sheets, the rising is due to the yeast.

Knead a détrempe with the sifted flour, salt, sugar, yeast and add milk gradually**.

** Sift together flour and salt then make a well. Add the sugar in the well. Now add milk. You can add a tiny part warm water to your yeast before adding to the well. Warning: Do not mix the salt and the yeast together because the salt kills the yeast.

Stop kneading once the dough is homogenous and give body to the dough – measure temperature 23°C – 25°C.
Let the dough rise in a temperature environment.
Once the dough has risen, punch it down and keep it in the fridge for use the next day.
Add the butter as in the feuilletage procedure.
Give one double turn and one simple turn.
Let the pâton rest in the fridge for half hour, taking care to cover it with plastic film.
Roll out the dough (60cm x 40cm) and cut to size/shape. Place the croissants on a baking sheet and egg wash a first time.
Let croissants rise about two hours in a prover at 25°C.
Egg wash a second time and bake at 220°C.

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These instructions are taken from the cookbook Pastry Recipes Anglophone Pâtisserie created by Ferrandi Chef Averty.

Feuilletage technique: how to create puff pastry

Welcome to the world of puff pastries and their thousand layers “millefeuille”. If the French are known to master anything better than anyone else, it’s this. They have an elegant way of creating puff pastry that results in flaky, crispy, buttery yet light melt in your mouth layers. How do they do it? Well, for students of Ferrandi, we finally learn the secrets this very wonderful traditional recipe, and we’re finding out that in fact, it’s still evolving.

Our first lesson in the creation of puff pastries, is a technique called, Feuilletage, to create the puff pastry dough, pate feuilletee. 

For a pate feuilletee traditional, there are two main parts.  The first part to create a dough called detrempe. The detrempe, is a mixture of greater flour to butter, [for example: flour 400g : butter 50g]. The second part, is a tablet of butter. We encase the tablet into the detrempe. This is called a pâton. We then want to incorporate this butter into the detrempe. We have a techique called, turns, or in French, tours. It’s a technique of rolling out dough, folding it like an envelope or book, and then rolling it out again, doing this a number of times, 5 tours generally, and refrigerating between each turn, or tour. And this is how you create those layers in the puff pastry. Of course there is a more scientific answer for why the flakiness but for now this is the basic understanding.

Then there’s the most celebrated method of feuilletage, the Feuilletage Inversee. It’s said that Pierre Herme evolved the modern puff pastry into something even more flaky, buttery and lighter. It’s also the method my Chef prefers, and he has good reason too. It’s the best puff pastry I ever tasted. So how do you make it? It’s like the name, you inversee or reverse the traditional method. The butter is on the exterior and you encase the detrempe in the butter. But rolling out just butter is impossible, so we need to add a minimum of flour to work with it, and this is called a beurre manie. The detrempe in the recipe for Inversee is only flour/salt and water (no butter).

Now, for flavoured pate feuilletee, we do:  feuilletage au chocolat and feuilletage a la pistache. We assume the role of Pate Feuilletee Inversee. Why? Because it’s the best! Feuilletage au Chocolat is a detrempe [flour/salt/water] encased into the beurre manie which has added cocoa powder. Feuilletage a la pistache is the same method, except we put pistache paste into the beurre manie.

The puffing of your pastry depends on how you prepare your dough –  right from the beginning when you mix the ingredients, to rolling, turning and refrigeration. There are butters for creams and butters for pastry dough, then your choice must be at the highest of quality. The choice of butter is absolutely crucial to the taste and behaviour of your puff pastry. Do not short change on ingredients when making a French puff pastry dough. You gain more by investing.

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Millefeuille Viennois

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Millefeuille aux framboises

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Millefeuille with fruit jelly

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Millefeuille Traditionnel

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Millefeuille Chocolat Praline

PUFF PASTRIES

Welcome to the world of puff pastries. If the French are known to master anything better than anyone else, it’s this. They have an elegant way of creating puff pastry that results in flaky, crispy, buttery yet light melt in your mouth layers. How do they do it? Well, for students of Ferrandi, we finally learn the secrets this very wonderful traditional recipe, and we’re finding out that in fact, it’s still evolving.

Our first lesson in the creation of puff pastries, is a technique called, Feuilletage, to create the puff pastry dough, pate feuilletee. 

For a pate feuilletee traditional, there are two main parts.  The first part to create a dough called detrempeThe detrempe, is a mixture of greater flour to butter, [for example: flour 400g : butter 50g]. The second part, is a tablet of butter. We encase the tablet into the detrempe. This is called a paton. We then want to incorporate this butter into the detrempe. We have a techique called, turns, or in French, tours. It’s a technique of rolling out dough, folding it like an envelope or book, and then rolling it out again, doing this a number of times, 5 tours generally, and refrigerating between each turn, or tour. And this is how you create those layers in the puff pastry. Of course there is a more scientific answer for why the flakiness but for now this is the basic understanding.

Then there’s the most celebrated method of feuilletage, the Feuilletage Inversee. It’s said that Pierre Herme evolved the modern puff pastry into something even more flaky, buttery and lighter. It’s also the method my Chef prefers, and he has good reason too. It’s the best puff pastry I ever tasted. So how do you make it? It’s like the name, you inversee or reverse the traditional method. The butter is on the exterior and you encase the detrempe in the butter. But rolling out just butter is impossible, so we need to add a minimum of flour to work with it, and this is called a beurre manie. The detrempe in the recipe for Inversee is only flour/salt and water (no butter).

Now, for flavoured pate feuilletee, we do:  feuilletage au chocolat and feuilletage a la pistache. We assume the role of Pate Feuilletee Inversee. Why? Because it’s the best! Feuilletage au Chocolat is a detrempe [flour/salt/water] encased into the beurre manie which has added cocoa powder. Feuilletage a la pistache is the same method, except we put pistache paste into the beurre manie.

The puffing of your pastry depends on how you prepare your dough –  right from the beginning when you mix the ingredients, to rolling, turning and refrigeration. There are butters for creams and butters for dough, you must choose accordingly. Also, the choice of butter is absolutely crucial to the taste and behaviour of your puff pastry. Do not short change on ingredients when making a French puff pastry dough. You gain more by investing.

Recipe for puff pastry, “feuilletage”

Creating puff pastry requires a French method of feuilletage, that is, layers of pastry leaves by the use of “turns”. And Pâte Feuilletée is the puff pastry itself.

Feuilletage

Flour, 400 g
Butter, 50 g
Salt, 8 g
Water approx, 200 g
Butter, 250 g

Rub the flour with the butter
Make a well.
Dissolve salt in water and add water to the center of the well.
Mix the flour and water gradually.
Knead without giving body to the dough.
Make the dough into a ball and cut an “X” into the top with a knife.
Let the dough rest for 30 minutes in the fridge. This dough is called the “détrempe”
Soften the second quantity of butter and form it into a square.
Enclose the butter in the détrempe. (This is now called the “pâton”)
Give either two simple turns (=2 folds) or two double turns (=3 folds) to the pâton.
Let the pâton rest for a minimum of 30 minutes in the refrigerator.
Give two more simple turns. (4 turns total for the pâton of simple turns or 5 turns for the pâton of double turn.)
Let the pâton rest for a minimum of 30 minutes in the refrigerator.
Use the pâton with double turns directly or give one more simple turn for the pâton with simple turns

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(left to right) Tour simple = 1 turn; Double tour = is actually 1 1/2 turn

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This recipe is sourced from the student class recipe book, Anglophone Patisserie 2013, created by Chef Patissier, D. Averty of l’ecole FERRANDI . The recipe can be subject to change at the discretion of the Chef or any other Chef at any time. The success of this recipe depends on a number of factors such as the quality of ingredients, temperature and quality of appliances, temperature of the kitchen, skill of the student and/or patissiere and  timing. This recipe does not include additional notes taken by miss pirisi at the time of making the recipe.